ISTC 2021

International Symposium on Topics in Coding 2021

Keynote Speakers

Warren J. Gross

Warren J. Gross

Warren J. Gross received the B.A.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, in 1996, and the M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, in 1999 and 2003, respectively. He is currently a Professor, the Louis-Ho Faculty Scholar in Technological Innovation, and the Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. His research interests are in the design and implementation of signal processing systems and custom computer architectures. Dr. Gross is a licensed Professional Engineer in the Province of Ontario. He served as the Chair of the IEEE Signal Processing Society Technical Committee on Design and Implementation of Signal Processing Systems. He has served as a General Co-Chair of IEEE Nanoarch 2020, IEEE GlobalSIP 2017, IEEE SiPS 2017, and as a Technical Program Co-Chair of SiPS 2012. He served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING and as a Senior Area Editor.

Hans-Andrea Loeliger

Hans-Andrea Loeliger

Hans-Andrea Loeliger received the Diploma in electrical engineering and a PhD degree (1992) from ETH Zurich. From 1992 to 1995, he was with Linköping University, Sweden. From 1995 to 2000, he was a full-time technical consultant and co-owner of a consulting company. Since 2000, he has been a professor at the Department of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering of ETH Zurich. His research interests have been in the broad areas of signal processing, machine learning, information theory, quantum systems, error correcting codes, communications, electronic circuits, and neural computation.

Olgica Milenkovic

Olgica Milenkovic

Olgica Milenkovic is a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), and Research Professor at the Coordinated Science Laboratory. She obtained her Masters Degree in Mathematics in 2001 and PhD in Electrical Engineering in 2002, both from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Her scholarly contributions have been recognized by multiple awards, including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, the DARPA Young Faculty Award, the Dean’s Excellence in Research Award, and several best paper awards. In 2013, she was elected a UIUC Center for Advanced Study Associate and Willett Scholar while in 2015 she was elected Distinguished Lecturer of the Information Theory Society. In 2018 she became an IEEE Fellow. She has served as Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of Communications, the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and the IEEE Transactions on Molecular, Biological and Multi-Scale Communications. In 2009, she was the Guest Editor in Chief of a special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory on Molecular Biology and Neuroscience.

Henry D. Pfister

Henry D. Pfister

Henry D. Pfister is a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Duke University with a secondary appointment in Mathematics. Prior to that, he was an associate professor at Texas A&M University (2006-2014), a post-doctoral fellow at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (2005-2006), and a senior engineer at Qualcomm Corporate R&D in San Diego (2003-2004). He is a coauthor of the 2007 IEEE COMSOC best paper in Signal Processing and Coding for Data Storage and has served the IEEE Information Theory Society as a member of the Board of Governors (2019-2022), and a Distinguished Lecturer (2015-2016). His current research interests include information theory, error-correcting codes, quantum computing, and machine learning.

Yury Polyanskiy

Yury Polyanskiy

Yury Polyanskiy is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a member of LIDS at MIT. Yury received M.S. degree in applied mathematics and physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow, Russia in 2005 and Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University, Princeton, NJ in 2010. His research interests span information theory, statistical learning, error-correcting codes, wireless communication and fault tolerance. Dr. Polyanskiy won the 2013 NSF CAREER award and 2011 IEEE Information Theory Society Paper Award.

Amin Shokrollahi

Amin Shokrollahi

Amin Shokrollahi finished his PhD at the University of Bonn in 1991 where he was an assistant professor until 1995. From 1995 to 1998 he was at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley. In 1998 he joined the Bell Laboratories as a Member of the Technical Staff. From 2000 to 2009 he was the Chief Scientist of Digital Fountain. In 2003 he joined EPFL as a full professor of Mathematics and Computer Science. In 2011 he founded the company Kandou Bus which designs fast and energy efficient chip-to-chip links.

Dr. Shokrollahi’s research covers a wide range of topics from pure mathematics to electronics. He has 200+ publications, and 150+ pending and granted patent applications. An IEEE Fellow, Dr. Shokrollahi’s honors include several IEEE Paper Awards, the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award, the Advanced Research Grant of the ERC, the IEEE Hamming Medal, the Mustafa Prize, and the ISSCC Jan van Vessem Award for outstanding European paper.

Pramod Viswanath

Pramod Viswanath

Pramod Viswanath received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from University of California at Berkeley in 2000. From 2000 to 2001, he was a member of research staff at Flarion technologies, NJ. Since 2001, he is on the faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign in Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he currently is a professor. His current research interests are in first principles design of blockchains.

Eitan Yaakobi

Eitan Yaakobi

Eitan Yaakobi is an Associate Professor at the Computer Science Department at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. Between 2011-2013, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the department of Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include information and coding theory with applications to non-volatile memories, associative memories, data storage and retrieval, and voting theory. He received the Marconi Society Young Scholar Award in 2009 and the Intel Ph.D. Fellowship in 2010-2011.